rimonish:

I CAN’T HUG EVERY CAT!!!

rimonish:

I CAN’T HUG EVERY CAT!!!

(via machiavellianfictionist)

ladyhistory:

The Sarcastic Captioned Adventures of George Washington

PART I | PART II | PART III | PART IV | PART V | PART VI | PART VII | PART VIII | PART IX | PART X | PART XI | PART XII | PART XIII | PART XIV | PART XV

georgetakei:

From a fan. That’s one to catch their attention…
savethewailes:

blossomcricket:

thisisnoise6:

hell no

hell yes

Level 6 kaiju codename: Cutiepatootie

savethewailes:

blossomcricket:

thisisnoise6:

hell no

hell yes

Level 6 kaiju codename: Cutiepatootie

(Source: lawebloca, via theladyoftime)

odditycollector:

roachpatrol:

This is fucking brilliant, and totally explains why the cherubs got the ultimate gendered master classes, too. There wasn’t any other option but the most basic and fundamental classes and aspects. 
It also explains what’s up with the Beforans— they’re literally a bunch of fucking noobs.

Maybe the Squiddles have the dreambubble expansion pack.

odditycollector:

roachpatrol:

This is fucking brilliant, and totally explains why the cherubs got the ultimate gendered master classes, too. There wasn’t any other option but the most basic and fundamental classes and aspects. 

It also explains what’s up with the Beforans— they’re literally a bunch of fucking noobs.

Maybe the Squiddles have the dreambubble expansion pack.

(Source: unpopular-hs-opinions, via theladyoftime)

averypottermormon:

honorarytenenbaum:

fili-kili-at-your-service:

a-tumbler-of-ice-and-fire:

What a boss

AND IT’S BACK ON MY DASH.

NO ONE’S GEEK GAME IS STRONGER THAN COLBERT’S GEEK GAME.

there may be a day I stop reblogging this, but today is not that day

(Source: from-under-the-weirwood-tree, via jibbyjibb)

hibrid56:

midnight crew :o

hibrid56:

midnight crew :o

(via theladyoftime)

fishingboatproceeds:

peterchayward:

fishingboatproceeds:

Earlier today, I met with several students at Addis Ababa University to discuss the opportunities and challenges they face in their academic and professional lives. 

One of the biggest challenges we have here on the Internet is hearing marginalized and underrepresented voices, especially those across the digital divide. You can’t amplify voices online that aren’t online.

While all of the young people I talked to used the Internet and most had regular access via a tablet, smartphone, or laptop, none had blogs or tumblrs or YouTube channels, and none had social network interactions with people outside their IRL social networks. I’m sure there are English-language tumblrs from Ethiopian students (although I haven’t been able to find any today), but almost all voices—even highly educated and privileged ones—from the world’s poorest countries go completely unheard online.

(And when we do hear them, it’s usually through an intermediary: videos edited by someone else, transcripts of interviews, etc. It’s not direct participation in the conversation by, for instance, posting to tumblr or reblogging HIMYM gifs. [The students I spoke to agreed that HIMYM is the best American show they have on TV, although a couple said that watching TV was a waste of time and a distraction from studying, to which I said HAVE YOU SEEN PHINEAS AND FERB BECAUSE IT IS TOTALLY EDUCATIONAL.])

Anyway, all of this is a long preamble to say: Earlier today I met with a 20-year-old law student who helped found an organization in Ethiopia devoted to empowering women and ending gender-based violence. (I’ll include her talking about her work in a video soon.)

The organization does fundraisers so the poorest women at the university can have access to contraception, and every year they have a Blood Drive for Mothers, where many students donate blood to combat maternal death. (Post-partum hemorrhaging is a too-common cause of death among Ethiopian women.)

We often think of global charity as people from rich countries giving money to people from poor countries. But the real story is much more complicated (and much more exciting!); we just don’t hear those stories often, because organizations like the one founded by the young woman I met don’t have YouTube videos or tumblrs.

Okay, this might be a dumb question, but…why don’t they have blogs? If they have access to the internet, surely making a Tumblr is a simple process that would directly get their voice out there?

Am I missing something obvious?

An Ethiopian nerdfighter who just got a tumblr responds:

"There’s no 3G coverage (as of yet) and mobile data is so terrible that it’s barely good enough to check your email. Watching a youtube video on a smartphone is unthinkable. Good internet access for your home is way too expensive to be affordable. You have a chance if you’re a university student because most of the universities here have free WiFi, but the hotspots are limited and you have to actively seek them out (which is what I do once or twice a week, to keep up with the world). And I don’t think most university students think it’s worth their time to REGULARLY seek WiFi hotspots so they can re blog stuff on tumblr."

My own experience is that even on the best university wifi networks, tumblr takes FOREVER to load (like several minutes for a single page), so there’s no way to load your dash (unless it’s all text) and posting usually fails. It’s just very different interacting with the Internet when your download and upload speeds are slower than dial up.